BUNNIES 🐰 VS DOGGIES 🐶

“ I choose a rabbit because it’s easier to care for than a dog!”

It’s quite common for us to hear this from people who never had rabbits before. Unfortunately this is a MYTH! Our founders, Jackie and Lynne, both have rabbits and dogs. Today, they will like to share their experience on bunnies vs doggies to dispute some of these common myths.

MYTH: RABBITS DON’T NEED AS MUCH SPACE!
FACT: Rabbits are high energy and the roaming space they require is similar to a small size dog. They should not be caged but instead, can be potty-trained and allow to roam in your home. You will also need to bunny-proof your home to ensure it’s safe for the rabbits as well as your properties!

MYTH: RABBITS ARE SHORT LIVING PETS!
FACT: Rabbits have a lifespan of 8-10 years which is quite similar to some dog species. This means you need to ensure their health throughout all stages by bringing them for health check and looking out for issues such as arthritis, cataracts and cancers when they are older.

MYTH: RABBITS DON’T REQUIRE MUCH ATTENTION!
FACT: Rabbits are less expressive than dogs which means you need to be more proactive in engaging them to build a good relationship. As prey animal, they don’t trust easily and when they are unwell, they will hide their discomfort. This is why good rabbit owners are very sensitive to their daily activities in order to pick up early signs of illness.

MYTH: RABBITS ARE CHEAPER TO MAINTAIN!
FACT: Rabbits require good quality hay and pellets which are imported products. They do require regular health checks and when ill, may need specialized treatment which can range from $100s to >$1000s. They are harder to handle so grooming as well as medical care may require professional help that can cost more than a dog.

Rabbits are very intellectual pets that can bring as much joy as any other pets. However, the right expectation is necessary to ensure you are well-prepared for the commitment. They should not be seen as an ‘easier’ option. Instead, they require a mature and independent caregiver who is motivated to learn about them, smart enough to decipher through social misconception, and patient enough to bond with a quiet prey animal.